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Rudkhan Castle and Masouleh
Exploring North of Iran

Tour Guide : ahmad talaee
 Description of Rudkhan Castle and Masouleh
     Rudkhan Castle
The Rudkhan Castle includes two parts, the citadel where the king lived there and the Armory part. The Rudkhan Castle belongs to the Sasanian era and later rebuilt during the Seljuq era by the Nizari Ismailis. It’s located on forest highs in the beautiful village of Rudkhan in Fuman County. The Rudkhsn castle building has been constructed in the area of 2.6 Hectares and contains strong fortifications and battlements. It has 42 towers and has stone walls with a length of 500 meters which still stand intact. The main section of the castle, which called “Shah Neshin” is close. Due to the castle was built beside a river, it has been called The Rudkhan Castle (Rudkhan is abbreviation of Rudkhaneh which means river). The Rudkhan Castle is the sort of place you visit once and long for forever. Surround yourself with stunning scenery of Hirkani forests, the mist which comes down off the mountains, fascinating history, mountains, villages, and most importantly, the amazing people who will help you appreciate it. This trip is ideal for the traveler who is short on time, but wants to soak up the colors, local culture, and history of a fascinating region in among an unbeatable and the stupendous dense forest that's small in size but big in adventure. The possibility for travel in this place is different. Don’t worry about forgetting your meal. About 2 kilometers before getting the Rudkhan Castle, there are many restaurants in which, you can have a delicious local cuisine. There is a parking lot at the castle site. The fee is 40,000 IRR. At the beginning of the rout, you can visit the local market, which sells a variety of local souvenirs and some simple equipment such as canes. If you visit the Rudkhan Castle in summer, you can find a local ice cream, which calls it “ESKIMO”. It is a mixture of ice, Sour Cherry juice, salt and some spice such as Persian Hogweed. It takes about 2 hours hiking to reach there if you have a normal physical condition, otherwise it takes more than 2 hours. After crossing over the mountainous winding route and climbing the steps, the first thing that dazzles your eyes is its bi entrance gate. Visiting this dazzling castle and picturesque landscape, make you an unforgettable and memorable adventure.
Masouleh:
More than a thousand meters above sea level on the slopes of the Alborz mountain range in Gilan, northern Iran, a remarkable village dating back to 1006 AD bustles with life. The unique ochre-brown structures of Masuleh follow the slope of the mountain that the village nestles on—or rather, grows from—giving the village its most unusual quality: the roofs of many of the houses connect directly to, or even form a part of, the street serving the houses above. The history of the ancient village can be traced back to a site which now lies six kilometers north-west of modern-day Masuleh. With the province of Gilan lying along the Silk Route, the village (previously known as Khortab, or Masalar) developed around an iron mine and soon grew into a thriving commercial hub with trade revolving around the ironworks industry. According to recorded history, the shift in sites was a gradual process led by several unfortunate incidents including a deadly plague epidemic and a massive earthquake. Now known as Kohneh Masuleh, or Old Masuleh, the ancient site exists as little more than a stretch of bare land strewn with rocks, while its (relatively) modern counterpart lives on nearby. Guided primarily by climatic concerns, the choice of location and height, and hence the spatial layout, is far from arbitrary. Building on levels lower than this would have brought with it the ever-present danger of flooding, and the Iranian winters would have made it too cold to occupy. The location of present-day Masuleh allows optimal solar exposure, temperature, as well as protection. Here, nature, architecture, and the community flourish together. This is a village built not by trained architects, but by the inhabitants themselves. Like all vernacular architecture, it is clever in its sensitivity towards the environment, climate, materials, and local needs and traditions. Houses built out of a combination of wood, adobe, and stone stand resolutely on a 60-degree incline. With natural rock at the foundation, and a sturdy “koh deevar” or “mountain wall” supported by the mountain slope at the back of each structure, the stepped village is built to be earthquake resistant. Not unlike how trade was central to the community in the past, the bazaar remains at the heart of the village. Here several handicrafts are made and sold but apart from craftsmen actively practicing and selling their goods to locals and visitors, local crafts are also an integral part of the buildings, especially the art of gereh-chini (traditional woodwork): south-facing facades of the two and three-storeyed houses are punctured with windows decorated with intricate wooden latticework. Not unlike how trade was central to the community in the past, the bazaar remains at the heart of the village. Here several handicrafts are made and sold but apart from craftsmen actively practicing and selling their goods to locals and visitors, local crafts are also an integral part of the buildings, especially the art of gereh-chini (traditional woodwork): south-facing facades of the two and three-storeyed houses are punctured with windows decorated with intricate wooden latticework.Most extraordinary of all, however, is Masuleh’s ingenious use of public space: with no marked boundaries, all rooftops double as courtyards, gardens and public thoroughfares for the inhabitants on the level above. Meandering stairways, narrow alleys and paths link one terrace to the other, and the village rises as one massive interconnected, multi-leveled public space shared by the whole community. Each narrow staircase in the village is equipped with a ramp as well, but only to accommodate the wheelbarrows that the locals use for transporting goods; due to its unique spatial layout, Masuleh is the only settlement in Iran where automobiles are strictly prohibited and pedestrians roam freely.
In its interconnectedness, it is reminiscent of the maze-like rooftops of the old town of Ghademes in northwestern Libya, but unlike Ghademes, the rooftops in Masuleh play an integral role in community interaction and friendly cohabitation.



 
 
 Further information of Rudkhan Castle and Masouleh

طبیعت گردی تاریخ
Day 1
Move early morning from Tehran to Qazvin. After having a breakfast, we continue on our way to the Fuman. After the lunch, move towards the Rudkhan Castle and explore this stunning castle. After the dinner, we come back to the hotel.
Day 2
After having breakfast, move towards the stunning and beautiful Masuleh village and visit the Mosouleh waterfall. After that, move towards the Fuman city and visit the Museum of Rural Heritage of Gilan and then come back to Tehran around the evening and arrive at night.
Sedan/minibus
A 3-star Hotel
2 Day(s)
Insurance
Accommodation: 1 night at the 3-star hotel
Five meals included, 2 snacks
Guide
Transportation 

                                
Sunglasses
Trekking shoes
Trekking pants (optional)
Trekking sticks (optional)
English,Spanish,French,German,Italian
Euro
79 Euro
Euro
89 Euro
Euro
119 Euro
Euro
139 Euro
Euro
29 Euro
On Request
06:00
On Request
22:00




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